Epilepsy, Janet & KitKats…

I was supposed to be in Krakow last week. Instead, I was at home, hiding in my family tree where I made a discovery of another epilepsy-related death in the family. This time on my mother’s side of the family. The not travelling thing is something I’m going to have to deal with quite soon. My confidence is just shot to ribbons.

Anyway, I’ve written before about GGG Agnes, she died during a seizure in 1914. GGG Agnes was my Dad’s great-grandmother. Janet, my Mother’s second cousin, died during a seizure in hospital in 1933. I wonder just how different their deaths were. What was it like to die at home in 1914 compared to a hospital in 1933?

Today, I spent another long day at the hospital, thankfully courtesy of a scheduled appointment, rather than my usual drop-in-uninvited-via-an-ambulance visit. More scans, more blood tests, more eye examinations, more questions. No more answers. No reasons as to why my body attacks itself. Nothing to help my mind understand so that it stops attacking myself.

I wonder if answers are what its all about though. I mean, it only really matters if the answers enable a resolution? Understanding the why is only part of the story. The next chapter is fixing the why; the prequel is prevention. For me, though, I need to understand the why. I don’t mean the “why me?”; I just mean the why. It’s the only way that I can sort of come to terms with my situation, even if I may never be able to change it. I participate in clinical studies fully in the knowledge that any discoveries made are unlikely to be able to help me, but they could change the life of another human being.

The consultants went to great lengths to explain that I didn’t do anything to give myself MS. On an intellectual level, I kinda get that. I want to get that. But, there is a niggle. An itch that can’t be scratched. With my epilepsy, I spent a long time believing it was the solely the result of a terrible skiing accident. My brother spent a long time believing it was solely the result of him breaking a snooker cue on my head when we were kids. My parents never offered an opinion and it wasn’t until I found out they knew about GGG Agnes that I understood their lack of opinion. In actual fact, it turned out that I was genetically pre-disposed and that in all likelihood the near-death experience in the Alps had simply triggered the faulty gene. It is virtually impossible that the snooker cue incident was the cause.

There are at least two incidences in my family tree to confirm the genetic disposition to epilepsy. I wonder how common it is to have at least one incidence of death by epilepsy on both the maternal and the paternal side of a family? Of course, knowing these relatives died during a seizure is different from knowing how many of my kin suffered from epilepsy but died from an unrelated cause.  I find myself looking through the death certificates amassed for my family to see if I can find anything that may point toward MS. I know its probably a futile exercise and I know that it would be virtually impossible to prove a link, but I feel like I have to do it. It’s a kind of compulsion.

MS can be genetic. You’re apparently more likely to get MS if someone else in your family has it or had it. So, I wonder if I will find that link, whether the gene is inherited or whether I’m just bloody unlucky. If both conditions are inherited then perhaps it’s a good thing I can’t have kids.

It’s interesting, to me anyway, to look back and see what kind of medical research was going on throughout the ages. Given that 1914 and 1933 seem to be featuring heavily for me at the moment, this is part of what I found (paraphrased of course!).

Most of the interest of the day seems to centre around electroencephalography. In 1912, a Russian physiologist, noticed the electric changes in the brain during experimentally induced seizures. In the same year, Pravdich-Neminsky, a Ukrainian physiologist, published the first animal EEG and two years later the first photographs of electroencephalography of a dog were published. Important discoveries in electroencephalography were made during the 1920s and 1930s. In 1924, Berger, a German neurologist, recorded the first human electroencephalogram. His results brought controversy and scepticism within the scientific community, but he was not ignored and his results were confirmed later. In 1932, Berger reported sequential postictal EEG changes after a generalized tonic-clonic seizure, and in 1933 he published the first example of interictal changes and a minor epileptic seizure using an EEG. Also in 1912, Alfred Hauptmann was able to synthesize phenobarbital, one of the first anti-epileptic drugs. Fascinating times and great strides forward being made in the clinical side of epilepsy, unfortunately, the social side was still lacking far behind.

So far, in my family research, I’ve not been able to find any clues as to whether MS has played a part in any of my family history. Apart from those deaths during seizures, there has been a worrying amount of heart disease, one “burned to death” in 1834 (must investigate whether she was attached to a stake at the time – the dates would fit with epilepsy=witch!) and an unfortunate dock worker who was hit on the head by a falling wooden beam. Nothing suggestive of an MS symptom, but there is much out there still to research about my relatives…

So, I’m left knowing I need to spend more time in the hospital next week. More tests! I do wonder if its worth it sometimes. I wonder how things would be if I didn’t have MS in particular. I don’t know what “normal” should feel like anymore and I miss knowing myself. It feels like the questions are designed to catch me out. Yes, I’m so very very tired, but I don’t know how much of that is related to the MS, depression and epilepsy! Why aren’t the doctors able to answer that question? Why does it seem to be down to me to know that answer? It’s frustrating in the extreme. I didn’t go to med school. I don’t know the answers and whereas I’m fully aware there is very little definitive info that can be given to me, I want to hear the consultants’ opinions and reasonings as to what is going on. It’s hard to know there are no answers. Phrasing questions like “could it be that…?” – well, of course it bloody well could be anything, but I don’t know! That’s why I’m here asking you the questions!! It’s like saying to me “well, you’ve highlighted there is a problem here, but how would YOU fix it…”.

Ok, so I’ve established I’m frustrated. Tired and frustrated actually. Stressed out? Yep, tick. Burning red twice a day? Yep, tick. However, on the positive side, so far at least, I’ve not burned to death; I’ve not been crushed by a log (my bro tried that one, when we are kids – didn’t work then, won’t work now); and I’ve discovered the wonders of Dark Mint KitKats. I don’t think you’re supposed to eat as many as I have, but to date, my hand-to-mouth co-ordination has not been affected by either MS or Epilepsy, so I’m bloody well going to make the most of it!

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