0

Is your battle my battle?

I agree. Fatigue is a big part of this post. I’m tired. I’m emotional not hormonal. I’m grateful for what I have, but feel short-changed. I feel guilty for feeling that way.

I read about a lady battling to get her husband the support he needs to live with his mental health problems. He’s homeless because he can’t be around his kids, he is being over-looked by an over-whelmed healthcare system. His kids know he’s homeless but don’t understand why he isn’t being helped. He doesn’t tick the right boxes so he isn’t a priority. He is deteriorating on a daily basis, his wife is desperate to help him but is being blocked at every turn. Yet, she keeps fighting. She fights every day.

People like her give me hope for a future that I struggle to see. She’s doing it for her kids. She’s doing it for her husband. The side effect of that, is that she is doing it for me and for you too. What society as a whole, I think, tends to forget, is that we are are ALL a single, unexpected event away from the situation this lady finds herself in. She didn’t marry a man with obvious mental health issues. She didn’t have children with a man with obvious mental health issues. Yet a single circumstance sees her on a 9-year battle to get help for him. I feel humbled by her battle and in awe of her strength.

And yet.

I, like so many of us, can’t comprehend her situation. Can’t see past our own circumstances. Is this wrong? On so many levels it feels like it is. I feel guilty because I can’t give the wider issue that she raises the due attention it deserves because I’m wrapped up in my own. Aren’t we all? On another level, I feel grateful. I feel such a sense of relief that I don’t have to live everyday raising small humans to be decent citizens while trying to explain to them how society, as a whole dare I say, is letting their father down. Is it enough to think “that’s terrible, I wish there was something I could do” and move on to the next story? Well we all know the answer to that. At least I hope we do. Yet, it really isn’t that clear cut and simple, is it.

My issues, my mental health problems seem minor in comparison. I equally hate myself and commend myself for saying this. My situation is different. Completely different. Yet, the facts remain. I have epilepsy, I have MS, I have depression (& before the pedantic police pull me up, yes I know I’m supposed to say “suffer”), I have mental health issues and I struggle to see a way forward. I’m still functioning in society though and for this I feel grateful. Or am supposed to feel grateful.

I just don’t know that a society by which it’s ok to let a man and his family suffer for 9 years because the man doesn’t fit the right boxes to get him adequate help is the society I want to live in. It seems all I can do to try to change that is continue to help the lady raise awareness of her situation and to vote. Oh don’t get me wrong. A huge part, the vast majority indeed, of society are good people. People who are shocked and saddened when they hear of issues like this. That’s a good thing. Yet, I feel that we are gradually moving toward a time where this lady’s circumstances are the norm.

How very sad.

My own issues, when compared to this lady’s pale in comparison. But they are still valid. They are my day-to-day. And I suppose that’s what we all have to remember. It’s all relative. I can’t compare my situation to hers because it’s so very different. I can sympathise, but struggle to empathise. Perhaps because I really, simply just don’t want to imagine what it must be like to walk in her shoes.

I feel tired. I bet she does too. I feel emotional. I bet she does too. I’m battling my own demons, I bet she is too. I am utterly fatigued. I wonder if she is too. Her kids are suffering more than a child should. I don’t have to deal with that. Her husband is suffering more than a husband should. I don’t have to deal with that. She is battling hard to raise awareness. I wonder if I do enough of that. She is battling every day. I wonder if I have the strength to do that. Her pleas for assistance from the relative bodies are, effectively, being ignored. I struggle to raise to the relevant bodies my pleas.

The differences are pronounced, but the similarities can be found.

The moral of the story, in my eyes at least, are epically biblical. “There, but for the grace of “xxx”, go I”.

Another disjointed outpouring from a fatigued and emotional mind.

3

What next…?

It gets to the stage when you seriously question just how many times you can pick yourself back up.

10 days ago I was travelling home after spending the weekend with my oldest friend. My parents had kindly picked me up and we were driving north. A few miles outside of Edinburgh, I started to have a seizure in the back seat of the car. My head banged hard multiple times off the car door. I was taken straight to A&E where it took some time to persuade me to leave the car and when I finally did I started the second of the seizures. This time I thrashed on the gurney. Truthfully, I don’t remember any of this. I suspect the story I’ve been told has been softened up a little. I did spend 3 days in hospital. I did have 3 seizures and I did give myself a small bleed in my brain as proved by a CT Scan that I don’t remember having.

I was discharged from hospital a week ago. I don’t remember too much about any of that, but I do remember starting to feel really unwell as time was going on. When it became a bit more apparent to me that there was something not quite right with my face, I called NHS24 & was given an appointment at a hospital.

Long story, short. I have been diagnosed with Bell’s Palsy. Half my face is paralysed; one eye doesn’t close; my ears are constantly ringing and yet there is a sense of deafness in my right ear. I can’t speak very well. I can’t eat very well. And without putting too fine a point on it, I’m pretty scared.

Apparently, there isn’t really anything that can be done for Bell’s Palsy. There is a small chance that steroids can help if they are given soon enough after initial diagnosis, so I am currently on a high dose of them, but there are no guarantees. I’ve been told that it’s hard to go out with my face looking the way it does – reassuring! I’ve also been told to try to do it as soon as possible – terrifying! I’ve been for more scans, so perhaps that counts as being in public?! I’ve also got another appointment tomorrow, so maybe that is good enough to reinforce the “get out there” mentality?

A few weeks ago, I wrote about wondering whether I’d done any of “this” to myself. Here I am again. Where to go from here? At what point do I get to feel sorry for myself without inviting the comments about being a victim? Surely, it’s ok to feel a bit hard done by, no?

Epilepsy. MS. Depression. Bell’s Palsy.

Can that not please be enough? Please! Apart from the headaches and the pain, I feel a bizarre kind of emptiness. A sort of “what’s the point”? I don’t quite know the purpose of these struggles. What am I supposed to be learning? Isn’t there an Idiots Guide to… I can read instead? Who the hell have I upset so much that these afflictions are my punishment?

Ah, here they come. The tears. I can blink them away from one eye, but the other just streams. I know it’s going to leave my eye red, sore and swollen. Yet, there is nothing I can do about it. Just something else, that I have no option but to put up with. When does it end? When will it end? What can I do to make this all go away?

Yep, feeling sorry for myself now. Who cares? I’m not strong enough to take this and if I want to dissolve into buckets of tears then where is the harm in that? I’m not hurting anyone by doing that and maybe I just need to know that it’s ok not to be ok. Right? We get told that don’t we? That we don’t have to be strong all the time and that it’s ok to be scared sometimes?

So, here I am. Another affliction I can’t control. Another solitary journey. Another route I can’t explain to another and more feelings of inadequacy.

I don’t know how many more times I can pick myself back up.

0

Ruminations with Rumi…

I feel like I’ve been fighting my whole life. There is a war that rages between my physical deterioration and my mental or emotional strength. The weapons used are cruel, there is little respite and the stakes are fricken enormous.

Rumi referred to emotions – all kinds of emotion – as “unexpected visitors”. Rumi thought we should let these callers in and let them visit with us for a while. Give them a cup of tea and get to know them type thing. This concept from the 13th century passed the stiff upper lipped British by. Why do we feel the need to be restrained and remain resolutely defiant when an emotion comes calling?

Rumi writes beautifully. Well, the way he has been translated from Persian to English is beautifully done anyway. I’ve only relatively recently been introduced to his writings and they resonate with me pretty deeply. I read all sorts for all sorts of reasons.

I read because I desire to understand. I read because I want to learn. I read because I need to get lost in a world that isn’t mine. I read because I long to escape. I read because I must. I read because I can. For now, reading is an ability that has escaped the tortures of my mind and body. Reading takes it all away. It’s my shelter and my comfort. It reaches into my soul and makes it laugh, makes it think, makes it feel invincible and makes it forget. Reading nourishes me. Language fascinates me. Evolving language, at once, gives me joy and makes me long for the days when Mr. Marshall taught me that “focussed” has a double s!

When I hear someone describing reading as boring, I can only think it’s because they haven’t found the right book yet. Going back to Mr. Marshall for a minute (he was one of my English teachers at school), he always said there was no such thing as a boring activity only boring people. I’ve turned that over in my mind a lot over the years between him first saying it (he said it a lot) when I was 14 and now when I’m 46. I came to the conclusion a few years ago, that what he was trying to say is that everyone is different and will feel differently about every activity, be it reading, playing football, singing…whatever. That means the activity in itself cannot be described as boring. Boring people, however, are those that choose not to engage in any activity at all. That’s what I think he meant. He’s dead now though, so I can’t ask him. I wish I had at the time. But, well, if wishes were horses, beggars would ride.

Anyway, I’ve digressed. I do that a lot. So, why do we find it so difficult to sit with our own emotions and acknowledge that we have them? Are we conditioned to believe that we should only feel positive emotions? Are we only allowed to feel happy, excited, thrilled, delighted, amused, loved, loving? Why do we feel its ok to acknowledge that we feel angry about something but not that we feel hurt by it? Why do we feel it is a weakness to be able to show vulnerability, but at the same time not be shocked when we get hurt? Why do we see it as inevitable that if we display an emotion that is not perceived as socially acceptable that we will somehow be thought of as a lesser person? Who decides what is socially acceptable??

My experience of showing emotion has not always been positive. I didn’t show my true feelings for years after I was told that my tears were pathetic and weren’t going to be put up with. I was 15. In order to swallow down the emotions I felt (& god knows at 15 I felt them ALL), I built some bloody fantastic walls. My grandad, a builder, would have been mighty proud of my structures. The wolves were not going to huff and puff and blow my house down! My house. There was no door. There didn’t need to be. I wasn’t coming out and you weren’t getting in. Simple. I was described as having ice water running through my veins. Apparently, it was discussed at length by people other than me, that I felt nothing. I felt baffled by this. If I showed that I was upset or hurt or confused or in pain then that was wrong, but if I showed nothing at all then that’s wrong too?

As a consequence of this inner conflict, when my emotions burst out of me as they are want to do, they were generally inappropriate. I couldn’t control them. I tried to channel them in the various sports I engaged in, although I didn’t know at the time that’s what I was doing. I was young, I was scared and I felt alone. So, I stuck everything in my solid house, climbed out the one window and tried to live a life that wasn’t full of anger and frustration. And I did.

I’ve had many, many wonderful adventures in my life. I’ve seen a lot of things others can only dream about. I’ve done a lot of things that others can only wonder about. My memory bank is full to brimming with wonderous colours, sights, sounds, people, noises, feelings, music and laughter. The flora and fauna of many a country are stored away to be brought out in writings or in musings or just to give a little colour to my day. All of this is juxtaposed with my house.

It’s only been in the last 10 years or so, that the window to my house has been cracked open. There is still no door. So if you want in, you have to really WANT it. One of Rumi’s most famous quotes is “the wound is the place where the Light enters you”. I liken that to the cracking open of that window and allowing someone other than me have a bit of a wander around. It surprises me to this day how hard I find it to let people into my life. This blog helps me immensely in my journey toward sorting through my house and throwing out old rubbish. I know now and acknowledge that I’ve been suffering from depression for most of my adult life. Acknowledging that was probably the hardest thing I’ve ever done, but liberating at the same time. For a few years, it was only me and my GP who knew. (When I think about this, it isn’t so. I suspect a lot of people knew that I was suffering, but god forbid they suggested it to me.) When I decided to go public, it was done so casually that when I think about it now it makes me giggle. I would just drop it into conversations. As an adult, I’m better at knowing when it is and is not appropriate to do certain things. So while I would throw out this comment about “my depression” it was always in the right place in the conversation. It had to be.

So, my mental state is on one side and the deterioration of my physical packaging is on the other. The MS diagnosis is still fresh and raw and I struggle every day to find positives in it. At the moment, most days, I don’t see any bright side at all. Well, other than the one that lets me say “it could be worse”. I was at the hospital a few days ago and tried to get answers to the muscle weakness, the internal inferno, the other changes that are happening to my body. There are none. No-one can tell me if the weakness is a relapse. They think it probably isn’t, but they can’t be certain. No-one can tell me if the weakness is the beginning of my MS getting worse. Right now, there is nothing to be done. There is nothing that can be done. Although I feel the time is right to start saving hard for whatever future is ahead and what kind of walking aid I may need. I contemplated building an extension to my metaphorical house. I decided not to. I can’t always articulate my feelings, but I no longer want to bury them. Mainly because I simply can’t be bothered anymore. Its hard work pretending to feel something that you don’t and it’s even more exhausting trying to deny a feeling that is pervading every cell in my body.

So, I know to expect my depression to be with me. I know that the medication I take for it allows me to deal with it, in the main. I know that the medication doesn’t make the depression go away, but it does give me a bit more of myself (if that makes sense) to be able to cope. I also know that, for me, I have to sit with it alone for a while so I can process it enough to share it. I’ve learned there are no hard and fast rules when it comes to dealing with depression. I know that what works for me, won’t work for everyone. I know that just because I’m willing to share my story, doesn’t mean that everyone wants to hear it. That’s ok. That’s actually how it should be. We aren’t all wired the same way. We aren’t all moved by the same things and we aren’t all disgusted by the same things.

Thank goodness!

So back to the words of Rumi…my body may seem meek, but my spirit does somersaults in the sky! At least it will when depression has finished it’s cup of tea and it’s visit is over.

0

MS & Marionettes…

Today, I stepped off the bus and I didn’t know if my legs were going to support me. Tomorrow, I’m going back to the hospital.

As I write this, there is a red, angry rash covering my whole body. It’s caused by the medication I’m on and it happens twice a day. I know it’s the drugs and I know it will pass, but there is a tiny sliver of me that wonders if this will be the time when it doesn’t go away. The rash is accompanied by a burning sensation that radiates from my head downwards. It truly feels like I’m being incinerated from the inside out. The itchy feeling makes me want to claw at my skin. I just want it to stop. I try to see the funny side. I look like a tomato and feel like one that’s being grilled. I feel a bizarre empathy for griddled foods. But it isn’t funny and I’m not laughing. Quite the opposite.

I feel like a puppet and the marionettist hasn’t a clue what they’re doing. I walked from the bus stop to work and with every step, I felt a weakness in my legs. The only other time I really feel my muscles is after an intense burst of exercise. Then it’s generally pain. Today, finding words to describe it adequately is hard. My legs felt weak to the point it was almost funny. The sensation was that of overwhelming weakness but no pain at all. I’m fully aware that my gait is all over the place and I’m supremely conscious of every other person hurrying to get on with their day. I don’t hurry. I can’t hurry. I’m scared to hurry. The invisible puppeteer with his invisible wires is leading my legs on a merry little dance that has no rhythm and no grace.

I know where I want my legs to go. I see the path in front of me and I’m trying to walk in a straight line. I know I’m not. I’m lurching almost from side to side. An old ankle injury seems to be bearing the brunt of my weird walk and I can feel a yelp from the joint. Not an out and out scream, but more that it’s reminding me that it has a valid weakness and it can’t really cope with the extra weight that is being applied at a weird angle. I don’t know that I have ever been that completely conscious of any part of my body before. Other than my eyes. A year ago.

My eyes have been feeling a bit off kilter too. They seem to leak a lot more fluid these days than ever before. I think it’s what people generally call tears. I feel fairly certain that I’m losing more than my fair share of them and I wonder if tears form part of the myelin sheath that’s meant to be surrounding my nerves, but is, in actual fact, leaking out of my tear ducts at a sometimes alarming rate. I’ve always worn my heart on my sleeve, but I was never a great crier. Until recently. Well, I say recently, but I mean in the last year or so. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve never been adverse to the odd crying session. Thankfully I’m not a wailer when it comes to the expression of tearful emotions, rather they escape silently, steadily flowing down my cheeks. I want to go back to the days when I wore my emotions on my face, but they weren’t accompanied by these hot little tears that are born of frustration, anger and fear. The problem with my eyes isn’t the tears though. I feel a pressure behind my left eye that makes it seem like it will explode at any given second. The fear that this is the beginning of a repeat of those terrifying weeks a year ago is bubbling through me. I wonder (or maybe hope) that it could just be a sinus issue and that’s what I’m feeling. Nothing to do with MS, but instead, a fairly common affliction that the vast majority of us have felt at one time or another.

I also have a, sometimes overwhelming, feeling of sadness. I’m still working that one out.

The feelings of muscle weakness that I have so inadequately described are accompanied by a terror that I try to pretend isn’t there. What if. I’m scared I’m on the verge of a relapse. I’m terrified because I don’t know how that feels and so can’t be certain. I don’t know if the weakness is just because I’m so very tired. All the time. Tired. I don’t know if I’m so focussed on every little thing my body goes through, that I am making a mountain out of a molehill. If I’m being really honest, when I try to describe these feelings to people, the blank looks and the sometimes fleeting expressions of disbelief make me feel fraudulent.

I can’t describe it. Others can’t understand it.

I used to understand my body. Epilepsy is an almighty pain in the ass, but I knew what to expect. I knew how I would feel. I didn’t always see it coming, but compared to how I feel every day now, I’m glad of that. It would hit me like a ton of bricks, leave me battered, bruised and depressed and then bugger off until it stored up enough energy to electrocute my brain again. Of course, I’m describing that in the past tense, but it is ever-present. Always in the background. Always watchful for the next chance to become the puppeteer.

Through the whole “woe is me” and the tears, I try to find the positives. My legs did support me today. I felt like a newborn-Bambi on ice, but I did make the short trip from the bus stop to the office. And I also successfully completed the return journey. Some would say I was worried over nothing, Unfortunately, that couldn’t be said until after I’d achieved the short walk to the office and the subsequent activities of the day. It went through my mind every time I sat down, that the last time I have stood up under my own steam, may have passed. Then I remember that I’m a drama queen and get over myself. But it is stored away in the cupboard that houses the electrical circuits.

At age 45, I knew me. At age 46, I’m a stranger to myself. What is it they say about strangers? They’re just friends we don’t know yet. It would seem that this stranger is going to become a friend I will have a love/hate relationship with!

Perhaps though, that will give me more cheerful things to write about!!

2

What’s the difference?

I’ve always tried to be open and honest about my epilepsy and how it affects me and therefore, potentially you. There are several reasons for this, the main one I admit is for a selfish reason – it is better for me if you know that I have epilepsy and so if you see me having a seizure you are less likely to panic as you know its “normal” for me. Secondly, I always offer to talk about the disease, the effect it has on me, my family and my friends; this, I believe, helps to raise awareness and go some way toward dispelling the stigma that unfortunately still surrounds the disease. I’ve talked about my own experience with stigma before (Epilepsy and Stigma…) so I won’t labour the points here, but it saddens me that it is still something that we have to cope with along with everything else. I also, selfishly again, like people to know that a diagnosis of epilepsy doesn’t have to be the end of the world. Although, I admit, sometimes it can feel that way.

Often, one of the first pieces of information a newly-diagnosed epileptic (yes, I know that in this modern world “epileptic” is a label that we shouldn’t use, but as far as I’m concerned I am epileptic, in the same way, that I am brunette and that I am green-eyed. It’s a descriptor in my book and not a bad word) is given, is a list of the things they can no longer do. Driving, swimming, diving, etc. Few, in my experience anyway, are given a list of things they can do. I like to believe that this is because the list of cans far far outweighs the list of can’ts. Even then, what we are told we can’t do is often a slight misnomer. For example. I was told I couldn’t swim anymore. I virtually lived in the pool. I swam every day for my club, I also was a regular high board diver. Being told that I could no longer go to the pool was devastating to me. And, it wasn’t true. I emphasise here, that there are many people who suffer far worse than me from their seizures and for them, perhaps, it isn’t safe. What I wasn’t told, was that providing I was accompanied by someone who knew of my condition and how to help me and that I informed the lifeguards on duty, then there was no reason why I couldn’t continue to swim. I did lose my driving licence and I’ve never been able to get it back. This is because my seizures can be unpredictable and while I have gone the required 12 months (it used to be 24) and so I could apply to have it reinstated, it would not happen as I can’t demonstrate that I am controlled and my GP would not sign it off. I think I miss the freedom that being able to drive would bring on so many levels, however, I balance this with the knowledge that I will never cause an accident through having a fit at the wheel and so potentially ruin another life.

Telling people I have epilepsy usually elicits two responses. The first, the most common, is that there is simply no acknowledgement of the information. That’s totally fine with me. I recognise that while I’m comfortable talking about it, others perhaps aren’t and for a myriad of reasons. The second response, is generally, “thanks for telling me that, it’s useful to know. Perhaps you can tell me about it?” Yet, what I only very occasionally hear, is “I have a friend with epilepsy” or “my xx has epilepsy”. In the 20 years or so that I’ve been extremely open about my disease, I can count on one hand the number of times that response has come. My experience sharing my MS diagnosis has been vastly different.

Telling people I have been diagnosed with MS has been a completely different kettle of fish, to announcing I have epilepsy. Firstly, it took so long to get a diagnosis, that I couldn’t tell people what was wrong, all I could give them was a range of afflictions of varying severity that it could be. The medical debate as to whether my optic nerve issues are MS or something else still rages on, but for the purposes of this post (and my mental well-being) let us pretend that it’s all MS related.

The initial similarities between the reaction to the MS diagnosis and the one for Epilepsy are actually pretty similar. Although, I guess that’s not really much of a surprise. Shock, terror, panic, tears etc were all present on both occasions in the early months following diagnosis. My lack of knowledge about both diseases was a factor. Epilepsy when I was 17 simply wasn’t discussed, I didn’t have Google (this was 1988 people) and I dealt with everything by internalising it. If I didn’t acknowledge it, it wasn’t happening. The classic, as my brother often describes it, sticking your head in the sand and hence leaving your ass exposed. I knew nothing at all about epilepsy and my knowledge of MS started and ended with horror stories, Jacqueline du Pre’s death springs to mind as being the only real story I knew of where MS was the destruction of her career and life. She was younger than I am now when she died. The only other exposure I had to MS was hearing about other tragic stories in the media. So my complete lack of any factual knowledge of either disease was total. As an adult, I think that I dealt with my MS diagnosis in a bit more of a mature way. At 17 I didn’t know what to ask and of who. Being as I’d basically shut down, then chances are I wasn’t going to ask anyway, but perhaps if I’d been pointed in the direction of a support group, then it may have changed things for me. Who knows? At 45, I asked questions. Sometimes, I didn’t get answers, sometimes I didn’t want to hear the answers, but ultimately, I had/have to face up to the facts as they present themselves.

When I did start to tell people I had MS, it usually elicits two responses. The first is along the lines of “oh shit” or “chr*st” or words to that effect. These responders are generally the ones that had the same negative exposure to MS that I’d had. The other typical response was a complete surprise to me. It’s along the lines of “my xx has MS” or “I have MS too” or “I know a couple of people with MS”. I did not expect this. Perhaps I was vain to think I was the only one!! It’s estimated that about 100,000 people have MS in the UK in 2016, while the figure for epilepsy is 500,000. It’s mainly for that reason that I was so surprised just how many people who I know and see regularly, have firsthand experience of living with MS or know someone who does. Given there are 5-times as many people with epilepsy than with MS, I’d have thought I’d know more people with exposure to epilepsy.

Does this mean anything? Does it mean there is less stigma attached to MS and so people are more likely to admit they either have the disease or know someone who does? Or does it mean that people with epilepsy are less likely to acknowledge their condition, especially if it’s well controlled? I don’t know the answer. I find it fascinating though.

The first person to be “officially” diagnosed as having MS – albeit posthumously – was Augustus d’Este, the grandson of The Mad King, George III. Although he wasn’t diagnosed during his lifetime, the diaries that he kept detailing his symptoms allowed for the diagnosis to be made. He kept diaries of his condition for 22 years, with the final entry being made 2 years before his death in 1848. However, the disease can be traced back to the 14th century to Saint Lidwina of Schiedam Although she died in 1433, historical texts tell of difficulties in walking, pains in her teeth and terrible headaches. This gave rise to the probability she suffered from MS. However, epilepsy has been documented as far back as 400BC with Hippocrates, no less, dismissing epilepsy as being no more sacred than other diseases in response to the belief at the time that epilepsy or the falling sickness was some kind of supernatural affliction.

There are long lists of famous people who have lived or do live with epilepsy. Bonaparte, Julius Ceasar, Dostoyevsky, Alexander the Great, Lewis Carroll and Prince to name just a few. Yet, I can’t find a similar list stretching through the ages for MS. The lists for those suffering MS seems limited to those currently living with the disease or those, such as Ms du Pre who have passed relatively recently.

I find the differences and similarities between MS and Epilepsy absolutely fascinating. The stigmas, the discussions and the history of both diseases being a source of both wonderment and inspiration.

0

Epilepsy and ???????

This is going to be a hard one to write I think. Although, the good thing is that, unlike with the last post, I’m actually not having to use voice recognition software. My sight has improved a little. What hasn’t changed, is that I have a second neurological disorder. In reality, I don’t know much more than I did when I last posted, but I need to write this down in order to get my feelings out and some of you have been with me on this journey from day one. If I can’t share it with you, then who….?

Epilepsy has been part of my life for nearly 30 years. I came to terms with having the disease (yes, I can call it a disease…Epilepsy and Words…), a long time ago. Of course, I still have bad days; days of “why me?”, but on the whole, I think I deal with it pretty well. The last couple of months, a new distraction has come my way. It turns out, final diagnosis pending, that I have a second neurological condition. Aren’t I the lucky one! Multiple MRIs, innumerable blood tests and antibody tests, medication galore, a stay in a hospital and the threat of a lumbar puncture later, I still don’t have a name for this new affliction. All I know for sure is that it’s degenerative, it’s cruel and it’s brutal. It tried to take my sight. It preyed on both my optic nerves and brought a degree of terror to my life that I haven’t felt for decades. My eyes aren’t the only recipients of this torture. Other parts of my nervous system have also been attacked. The severity of those attacks is still up for debate. Apparently, it’s “early days” and “too soon to be certain”. I’m still trying to get what’s left of my brain around that!

I’m still finding it all hard to take in. I can’t say I have fully come to terms with what’s going on. I think that’s mainly because I don’t really know what is going on! What I do know is this. I’m not the same person I was just 2 months ago. I can’t help but think I’ve been given a kind of challenge. My brain has thrown down a gauntlet; I have no real choice but to respond. How to reconcile the brain and the body? How to balance the head and the heart.? How to rise to the challenge, fight what is proving to be a bloody battle and not lose my essence? The past weeks have shown me some hard truths and tried to teach me some tough lessons. I say “tried to”, because I don’t think I have really come to terms with enough of this situation to truly be able to know what I’m being taught.

Epilepsy tried to teach me to be strong – but I’m not strong enough. Epilepsy tried to teach me resilience – but I’m not resilient enough. Epilepsy tried to teach my humility – but I’m not humble enough. Epilepsy tried to teach me to be brave – but I’m not brave enough. Epilepsy taught me so much, but it seems I have so much more to learn. I haven’t worked for 2 months, my sight isn’t good enough and another seizure floored me a month ago. Suffering a fit was no great surprise. A combination of stress and the, almost, total lack of sleep really made it a bit of a foregone conclusion! That being said, seizures always knock me for 6 and this one was no exception. I’d only got my chipped teeth fixed at the beginning of the year too!!

Anyway, as is always the case following a fit, reflection takes over at the top of my list of things to do. This time though, my mind was in overdrive anyway and I find that I haven’t been able to fully process the seizure and piece together the events that lead up to it. I’ve blogged before about how I need to be able to put together the timeline in order to start the process of acceptance that I need for me. So, while I know what the trigger for the fit was, I’ve lost time and I don’t know how to fill those hours. Maybe I’ll get to that later…

My jigsaw is featuring heavily in my thoughts at present. The corner pieces are still valid, 45 years worth of the big picture are in place, but what is next? Someone I trust said that you don’t have to have all the jigsaw pieces gathered to know how the picture is going to turn out. That’s very true. So, what do you do when you can see the pattern and don’t like what is forming? Well, you just pick new pieces and use those, right?!

Easy! Job done! haha – if only!! Picking up new pieces means forming new patterns and changing, what may well be, deep-rooted behaviours. For some folks, I dare say those changes may be easy, for others it may require them to embark on the toughest of journeys. It is true that some changes are easier to make than others and it’s also true that what is easy for one is another’s worst nightmare. That’s what makes us individuals. That’s what has been going through my mind. I look at the pieces already laid and I see patterns, I see a lot of habits that aren’t helpful to anyone least of all me. I don’t have all the bits, but I can predict what will happen if I don’t choose a new colour scheme for my brain!! So, it’s time to redecorate. Re-evaluate what is important and what is just window dressing and learn to adapt.

I’m removing toxic people from my life. If they don’t notice, then it proves they have no real place in my life anyway. I’m trying to care less about things of no real consequence; I’m trying to figure out what those are! I’m persuading myself to be open to opportunities and to stop letting fear (or laziness!) from making my life little.

None of us knows what will happen tomorrow, or indeed in the next hour. We can plan what we want to do and map out our days and hours by the minute if we want to, but we simply have no way of knowing what life is going to throw at us at any particular point. There is a saying I can’t quite remember how it goes but it’s along the lines of – “there is nothing more certain than death and nothing more uncertain than the hour”. In broader terms, death truly is the only real certainty in life, but when it will happen is anyone’s guess. So, this leaves the terms of life wide open really and it’s up to the individual how they choose to live it. Life throws spanners at us all the time. Some miss and some get stuck in the wheels, it is up to us to decide what we do about them.

I have achieved much in my 45 years. I’ve seen and experienced extraordinary delights, cultures, people and places. Adrenalin has coursed through my body and driven me to experience some of my wildest dreams. I want to stop saying that in the past tense. Epilepsy taught me so much; this new test will teach me so much more.

 

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Dear brain…

Dear brain,

For 30 years now, you, my body and my soul have been fighting. My body and soul are exhausted from the constant feuding, the intermittent bloody battles and the never-ending war. You have waited, until this time, to play your trump card. You held the hand that no-one saw coming. You were nurturing another neurological affliction alongside, perhaps marginally overlapping, my epilepsy. Well played.

The past 3 weeks have been the most frightening of my life. You still refuse to give up your secrets though and confirm what, exactly, you have in store for me next. My sight is failing – will it return? The nerves I so desperately rely on are scarred and battle weary – will they ever heal? You know the answers, dear brain, please reveal them.

I’m tired, I’m scared and I don’t know how to deal with this. The irony is not lost on my soul. You, brain, control this. You, in all your wonder and secrets, hold the key to everything that I know as “life”. What did I do to wrong you so? Are the 23 tablets I took this morning to help you, along with the 3 more I have to take tonight, not enough for you to know I want you to heal? My soul needs you to heal, my body can’t live without you.

I’m on my knees and begging you now. I’ve tried hard to be strong these past decades. I know that I haven’t always been able to meet your expectations and I know that I have often shrouded you in a dark depression. I haven’t had the courage to ask for help when I needed it most and I know that must have caused you pain. Please don’t punish me.

I resolve, here and now, to be better. I want you to heal, I need you to be well and I will do whatever it takes to make that happen. Please don’t take my sight. There are so many wonders in this world that I’ve been too afraid to explore. I want the chance to see them.

I don’t want to have to use this voice recognition software, I don’t want to be afraid. I know that my sight can be restored, maybe not to as good as it was, but enough to do the things that still need to be done. I want you back brain. Remember how it used to be for us? It can be like that again, just tell me how. Show the doctors what you need. Please.